Tis the Season to decorate with Christmas Quilts

Have you done any holiday decorating yet?  I like to watch “The Sound of Music” while I decorate my tree, and sip a cup of egg nog under my Christmas Quilts at some point in the last days of November, but this year is rushing by.  It’s my own fault…I wanted some extra holiday cash so I started a seasonal job.  The downside is that I am working from 4pm to midnight which doesn’t leave much time for holiday fun!

Disclaimer…this post contains affiliate links.  My full disclosure policy can be read here.

Turning 20 at Christmas

let’s get to the good stuff! I have a few holiday projects to share.  First is a classic quilt pattern  – Turning Twenty.

Turning 20 quilt in Christmas fabric

I was trying to collect Christmas batiks, but I never found enough, so this quilt turned into a eclectic mix of holiday fabrics.  It features lots of holly and snowflakes,  with a few snowmen and ornaments thrown in.

Here is a closer look at the fabric.

fabric for a Christmas quilt

I made a pieced backing from 16″ square, cut from the leftover fabric, but I did not line things up very well.  Please look away if you are OCD…there are no straight lines on the back!

pieced backing for a quilt

I found a great holiday pantograph for the quilting that features poinsettias.

pantograph quilting poinsettias

My mom and grandmother always have fresh flowers for the holidays, but I worry about my cats and potential harmful effects, so we make do with our fake Christmas tree and wooden Nativity scene.

Christmas Quilts – Bargello

An easy pattern for the busy holiday season is bargello.  I made the strata for this wallhanging with 2-1/2″ strips, then cut them to varying widths and offset the strips to form the wave.

bargello quilt for ChristmasThis would make a fun pillow too!  Hmm, my 2017 project list is already growing!

Other Holiday Sewing Ideas

Every year, I wish I had a coordinating family set of Christmas stockings.  That needs to be on my July agenda if I have any hope of finishing before Christmas 2017!  Amy at Diary of a Quilter has a cute tutorial that I have bookmarked.

What about special holiday placemats?  Check out my Stack-n-Slice technique on Skillshare! (This link gives you a discount on premium membership.)

Shopping on Cyber Monday?  Please visit my quilting friend Sherri at Rebecca Mae Designs for some gift ideas and sweet savings!

Read about my Christmas Quilt with free motion designs here.

 

Free Motion Monday – Shadow Quilting

Shadow Quilting Designs

I invented the term “Shadow Quilting” to refer to the places where I use free motion quilting to copy the block design in the negative space of the pattern.  Of course I saw a beautiful example of this somewhere on the internet last week and now I can’t find it! In my search for additional examples, I visited Judi Madsen’s blog, and she wrote a whole book on this technique. Look for Secondary Designs with Judi Madsen, due out in December 2016.

Shadow Quilting, using block designs in negative space, is gaining popularity in modern quilting circles.  Negative space and alternate gridwork are core principles characterizing modern quilts as defined by the Modern Quilt Guild. I am delighted when I look closely and find replicas of patchwork illustrated solely with thread.

Shadow Quilt a Checkerboard

Checkerboards are an easy design to “shadow.”  Once the grid lines are stitched, you can choose from many designs to fill alternate squares.  I like the simplicity of lines or spirals.

shadow quilting checkerboard diagram

Shadow Quilting with Shapes

In the quilt I am currently working on, there are bold triangles and diamonds in the border.  I decided to use these elements to anchor the free motion designs in other areas.  I first stitched the shape, then added the swirls inside and finished with the outside fill.

shadow quilting with shapes fmq-shadow-designs-fabric

shadow quilting diagrams

Another example from Judi Madsen’s gallery is the Tree of Life quilt.  She created frames in the negative space, then filled them with grids and flowers.  Judi is a master at using rulers with her free motion quilting, and she stitches shadow blocks in many of her quilts.  As with any skill you want to improve, it takes practice, practice and more practice!

Free Motion Quilting – Piano Keys

A simple example of Shadow Quilting is a piano key border.  This can be as simple as straight lines, or more intricate with arches.

fmq-piano-keysfree motion quilting piano key borders

What patchwork blocks are in your quilts that can be mirrored in the free motion quilting?  Please send pictures to info@truebluequilts.com so I can build a gallery of inspiration!

More you might like:

From Sketchbook to Finished Quilt

My “graffiti” style

Download a practice workbook of free motion quilting designs HERE.

 

Inspiration – Sew Pro Stars Blog Hop

Welcome to the Sew Pro Stars Blog Hop!  Here you will find a variety of sewing projects inspired by the information and interactions from Sew Pro 2016.

Sew Pro Stars Blog Hop

What is Sew Pro?

In September, I took a bold step in building my quilting business. I traveled from Phoenix to Chicago to attend the Sew Pro convention.  It was a gathering of sewing professionals to meet, mingle, and learn some business-building strategies.  The organizers, Brenda Ratliff of Pink Castle Fabrics, and Sara Lawson of Sew Sweetness, planned four tracks of lectures. Attendees could choose from pattern designers, fabric designers, authors, and bloggers.  Lecture topics ranged from publishing tips and intellectual property rights, to technology tools and the travelling teacher life.  When I returned home, I knew I wanted to continue the collaboration with the wonderful people I met.  I reached out to my fellow sewists on Facebook, and we agreed to share during this blog hop.  Please visit everyone and prepare to be dazzled by the amazing creativity and talent!

Sew Pro attendee True Blue Quilts

At Sew Pro, our keynote speakers were Pat Sloan and Tula Pink.  I came home with pages and pages of notes just from those two speakers.  The conference was jam-packed with great information about the opportunities for quilters and sewists in the larger fabric industry.

Tula Pink sharing the Elizabeth fabric line

Inspiration

As I pondered how to express the lessons from Sew Pro within a fabric-based project, I explored Pat Sloan’s website.  She is a powerhouse in the quilting world, hosting a weekly podcast as well as designing quilt and writing books!  You may have heard of one of her little projects…the Splendid Sampler, a 100-block quilt along that has thousands of participants. From the Splendid Sampler patterns, I found the perfect block to represent Pat and the Sew Pro conference: #61 Traveler, coincidentally published on the weekend we were all in Chicago!

traveler block with slow and steady fabric

Tula Pink is an amazing artist.  I love her color sense and the whimsical animals she designs.  The Traveler blocks were made with fabrics from her Eden line.  Also, I am featuring two prints from her new line, “Slow and Steady.”  The hare is a tribute to my mom, a collector of porcelain rabbits, who inspired me to quilt when she opened a fabric store.  The snails remind me that building my business is not a sprint.  The Traveler blocks signify life’s journey…my trip to Sew Pro and all the places quilting has taken me.  I can’t wait to see what comes next!

But Wait…there’s more!

To make the Sew Pro Stars Blog Hop extra-special, let’s have a giveaway (or TWO!)!

First, for subscribers to my newsletter, Loose Threads from True Blue Quilts, I am offering the scrap pile from the above project.  It includes 5 fat-eighth size pieces of Tula Pink fabric and a copy of  any of my single patterns (shown here).  I will conduct a random drawing from the list of subscribers on Saturday, Nov 19 at 12 noon Arizona time.

 

** A winner has been drawn!  winner for blog hop prize
Congratulations Vanessa!  Check your email for details 🙂

Secondly, enter for the grand prize package by following this Rafflecopter link.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Visit the other quilters and sewists on the Sew Pro Stars Blog Hop:

Monday Nov 14

Lisa Peterson – Lisa and Lorelai

Sherri Noel – Rebecca Mae Designs

(you are here) Andi Stanfield – True Blue Quilts

Tuesday Nov 15

Vanessa Behymer – Vintage Barngirl

Pam Cobb & Lynn Rinehart – The Stitch TV Show

Sherry Shish – Powered by Quilting

Joanne Kerton – Canuck Quilter

Lisa Nielsen – Lisa Lisa and the Quilt Jam

Wednesday Nov 16

Carmen Ross – See Carmen Sew

Anne Beier – Hudson Valley Quilts

Jessica Caldwell – Desert Bloom Quilting

Pamela Morgan – Sweet Little Stitches

Thursday Nov 17

Maryanna Powell – Marvelous Auntie M

Cathy Smith – A Quilting Chick

Lissa LaGreca – LovinglyLissa

Paula Mamuscia – Creations by Paula

Friday Nov 18

Becca Fenstermaker – Pretty Piney

Holly Stockley – Lighthouse Lane Designs

Teri Seal – Day Moon Quilts

Trinia Braughton – Penguin Feats

Deanna Wall – Stitches Quilting

Productive Retreat

Quilting retreats are the best!  Working from home gets lonely, so I am always excited to join other quilters for a day of sewing or taking a class together.  Last week, I joined my church’s Quilting Retreat and we had a blast.

The hostess planned simple meals and turned on Netflix while we worked. One gal sewed bindings, another hand quilted, some baby quilts were finished and many borders sewn on.

Quilting Retreat Project 1: Easy Pillowcase

My first project was a Halloween pillowcase for my daughter. The fabric was purr-fect for my cat lover.  I used the All People Quilt Roll It Up pattern. This will double as her Trick or Treat bag before it goes on the bed.roll it up pillowcase with halloween fabric

Quilting Retreat Project 2: Charity Quilt

Next on my to-do list was to finally sew my split nine patch blocks into a quilt top. It took me several years of stitching these blocks in between other projects to have enough for a 60×72 quilt.

quilt blocks

I spent some time playing with half square triangle designs in EQ7 and settled on this one.

Quilts of Valor split nine patch

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Read more about why I love EQ7!

Quilting Retreat Project 3: Something for me!

By day three of the retreat, I was ready to tackle my final project.  At a quilt show last spring, I fell in love with the Two Color Bargello quilt (find the pattern and kits here). It comes in many colorways, but blue is my favorite so I decided this would be a new quilt for my bedroom.  It needed borders, so I improvised the inserts of the focal prints with the ombre and black fabrics.

two color bargello in blue

A very productive retreat!  And sharing stories and laughter with good friends is even better.  I highly recommend going on a quilting retreat.  If travel to a camp is not in your budget, follow the low-cost option that my church group uses. Someone opens their home, everyone brings their machine and a folding table, buy pre-made pasta for lunch and dinner and you are all set for days of stitching fun!

Free Motion Monday – Quilting Designs in Triangles

spiral quilting pinwheel block

I have been trying some new patterns using the Angle Play templates.  Angle Play quilts feature strong graphic lines formed by half-square and half-rectangle triangles and lots of pinwheels.  It’s time to think of new quilting designs in triangles! A Basic … Continue reading

Plan your next Shop Hop!

Next week, I am taking a road trip with my quilting friends.  The quilt shops in our area are hosting a Shop Hop, an event that is common all across the country.  Since I am on a strict budget, I need to plan for a shop hop!

flyer for maricopa county shop hop 2016

What is a Shop Hop?

First, let me explain the basics.  Shop hopping is a day of visiting related stores. Many times shop owners will coordinate a specific period of shopping, plan special events and giveaways, and offer prizes to people who stop at every participating store. When you begin, you are typically invited to purchase a “passport” that will be marked at every shop. A full passport becomes your raffle entry for a grand prize.  I was lucky enough years ago to win a store’s raffle basket with wonderful fabrics that I turned into my Sedona Stars quilt.  quilt made from shop hop fabrics

Plan for a Shop Hop

As much fun as a full day of quilt store shopping sounds, it can be depressing when you are on a limited budget.  I want to support small business and independent store owners, so I always try to make a purchase at every stop.  Knowing that I have to make smart purchases I created this plan for a shop hop.



Tip # 1 – Think about your future projects

Are you starting a new quilt?  Is your UFO pile growing because you need borders or backing fabric?

unfinished quilts

Start your shopping list with fabric.  Be sure to include specific colors, sizes and those special designers and fabric collections that you have been drooling over in your Instagram feed!

If you are a scrappy quilter and have a sufficient stash, think about supplementing with colorful pre-cuts.  One of my local stores has a scrap bin near the register and I always find delightful fabrics in fabulous color combinations.

Tip #2 – Inventory the basics

Take a look at your notions.  Thread is a necessity, so put those basic colors on your shopping list.  I generally piece with a beige or grey but you may need bright colors for an upcoming project.  Are you working with bent pins? Treat yourself to a new box of straight pins.  Having fresh, sharp tools makes preparing your quilt pieces so much easier.  Stock up on new rotary cutter blades now!  Don’t overlook your sewing machine – grab some needles while you are in the notions aisle.

pins-needles-thread-fabric-essentials

Tip #3 – Shop for Gifts and Souvenirs

A shop hop is the perfect time to grab some gifts for your crafty friends.  Many shops have items such as notepads, pincushions, bobbin holders and scissor fobs that make lovely and useful gifts for fellow quilters and sewists.

shop hop books gifts shop-hop-books-gifts

If you are far from home and want a souvenir, look for local patterns and fabric.  The recent Row-by-Row Experience with the coordinating fabric license plates are fun to collect.  Books make wonderful gifts so make a list of titles for yourself or others.  The coloring craze is in full swing and designers are on board with coloring books featuring quilting designs and full quilt layouts.

So, are you ready to plan a shop hop with your quilting friends?  Be sure to download the planning guide and make notes about the fabric, books, notions and gifts you are interested in.  Drive safely and have fun shop-hopping! I’d love to hear about your crafty road trips so please tell me about your adventures.

Three Ways to Choose Quilt Colors

In Quilting 101*, we learn that designs are built on contrast. When it’s time to choose quilt colors, many quilters start out with a dark design on a light background. Gradually we learn to use a wider range in our color palette and medium fabrics creep in. Visit the Quilting Room with Mel for an informative discussion about finding medium values for your quilt colors. But, planning a quilt can be difficult, so let’s take a look at some modern quilts and learn how to choose quilt colors.

*While there may be class out there with this title, I use the title in jest!

Choose Quilt Colors for Contrast

The idea of contrast is built in to the color wheel, and it is one reason I love rainbow quilts that show off all the colors!how to choose quilt colors

Mother Nature has done the theoretical work for us – Red and Green are complementary, and we can add a splash of interest with another color such as pink, orange or yellow.

The shades of each color must work harder when a quilter chooses a black background. Colors have to be much brighter to contrast and allow the design to POP.

Dear Jane quilt with black background

What happens when you don’t have a single color background? The light, medium and dark values within a color family have to really work well together to make the design shine.

Note: this post contains affiliate links. Please read the full disclosure policy here.

Color Choices from a Quilting Rockstar

I was blown away when I saw Tula Pink‘s Radiance quilt, featuring her new Slow & Steady fabric line.  Let me try to analyze this beauty and the lesson it can teach us for how to choose quilt colors.

tula pink quilt colors

At first glance, you see the solid diamonds as a rainbow. Look closer, though, and you see a variety of prints mixed in too. The diamonds are shades of red, green, pink, white, yellow and orange, set on a mix of backgrounds in blues, purples, turquoise, grey and black.

Tula Pink's great sense of color for quilts

The result is mesmerizing as your eye follows the flow of colors as they rise and fall across the quilt.

Lesson – Whole color families, not just 2 colors, provide contrast in your quilt.

Color Blocking as a Quilt Palette

Another brilliant quilt featuring saturated colors is Star Light, Star Dark by Jessica at the Quilty Habit.

color block example from QuiltyHabit.com

Rather than set colorful stars on a consistent background, Jessica shows us how to choose quilt colors with the color block style. Each section is monochromatic, featuring a dark star on a lighter background or vice versa. The color saturation and variety of block sizes make Star Light, Star Dark a gorgeous example of modern quilting.

Lesson – keep it all in one (color) family and try a color block quilt

Keep it simple with just one color

Another method to help choose quilt colors is to pick one color family and make a monochromatic quilt. The placement of light, medium and dark fabrics are critical to the design in a monochromatic quilt.  Purple Angles by Mary McElvain features a paper pieced block.

how to choose colors for a monochromatic quilt

By changing the position of fabrics within the block, you can highlight a cross or a ring.

how to choose colors for a monochromatic quilt how to choose colors for a monochromatic quilt

 

 

 

 

Lesson: Monochromatic quilts have amazing variety!

Let’s continue to experiment with color selection in our quilts. Choose an unusual color or gradient for a background, or try color block and monochromatic palettes. Change the position of light, medium and dark fabrics in your block to discover alternate designs. Most of all, enjoy the creative process!

 

Free Motion Monday – Double DNA quilting design

Once the piecing is done, a quilt becomes a blank canvas for the quilter.  What elements do you want to highlight? What stitching patterns can you add to enhance and complement the overall look of the quilt?  I came up with the Double DNA quilting design to fill a sashing/border section on this Angle Play quilt.

angle play quilt features double dna quilting design

Stitching the Double DNA quilting design

Start with a ribbon wave (tutorial here). Overlap these ribbons to create the classic DNA pattern.  tutorial for double dna quilting design

The DNA strand makes an elegant texture all by itself, but I thought this quilt needed a little more.  I added pebbles between the ribbons.

add pebbles to double dna quilting design

I rarely mark my quilts, so my stitching gets a little wobbly.  If you prefer a uniform look to your quilting designs, grab a chalk pencil and mark the guidelines for the top, bottom, and middle of the quilting design.

actual stitching for double dna quilting design

Two ways to stitch pebbles

Stitch the pebbles in the same way you stitched the ribbons – start with a wave, and then repeat in the opposite direction.  The alternative is to stitch the pebbles as circles.

Additional free motion quilting designs

Note: this post contains affiliate links. Read the full disclosure policy here.

There are many shapes and colors in this quilt, which was cut using the Angle Play templates.  I selected matching thread for each section and that makes some of the stitching difficult to see unless you are taking a close look.  I used long worms/wavy lines in some of the triangles, coffee beans in the orange squares, and lots of feathers in the light areas.

stitchinfree motion feathers on angle play quilt

The designs are easier to see on the background, where the thread has more contrast.  free motion quilting designs

Thread choice is an important decision. Consider the skills of both the piecer and quilter – a novice who is more likely to make mistakes and wobbles may want to hide their stitching, while a experienced quilter may want his/her work to take center stage.

Are there any designs you would like to see?  Please comment or send an email to info@truebluequilts.com.  I’d love to hear from you!

Free Motion Monday – Quilting Animals

One of today’s most popular quilt designers is Elizabeth Hartman.  I have admired her Fancy Forest pattern for a while, so I was thrilled when a customer brought me one to quilt.  The challenge was to complement her beautiful piecing while free motion quilting animals with interesting texture.

quilting animals

Fuzzy Faces – free motion quilting animals

I outlined each animal, then used a coordinating thread for the detail stitching.  I used several variations of wavy lines and zig zags to mimic whiskers and fur on the fox and bunny. The hedgehogs were embellished with skinny flame stitches.  A simple echo filled the butterfly wings.

Related post: Flame Stitch Variations

Ribbon Candy and Leaves

The thistle blocks are my favorite!  I created the ribbon candy stitch by alternating the direction of a teardrop as I moved up each section of the thistle blossom.  I stitched a wavy stem and fit a leaf into each triangle of the flower.

free motion quilting ribbon candy design

Related post: stitching leaves

Owl Feathers

For the body of the owl, I stitched scallop hills (detailed in this blog post).  Spirals gave detail to the eyes and wavy lines filled in the head and feet.

free motion quilting

Quilting animals is pretty easy.  Think of it as sketching with thread.  What kind of details would you add to a paper-pencil drawing?  You can add those same motifs to your quilt.

Background quilting designs

If you have ever entered a quilt into a show, you know that judges are looking for consistent density of stitches across the quilt. I knew that I would be adding alot of detail to the animals, so I needed a background design that complemented the overall look of the quilt.  A simple loopy meander provides a nice balance. (Visit this post for more about that design).

I left the rainbow accent border plain, and stitched parallel lines in the outer border.  I stitched these lines free-hand, using the hopping foot as a guide for the small distance, and estimating about an inch between sets of lines.

Free Motion Monday – Simple Designs for Strip Blocks

free motion quilting strip blocks

The Bali Fever pattern by Judy Neimeyer is a stunning quilt.  The fabric and piecing should take center stage so I chose simple free motion quilting for strip blocks.  The loops and wavy lines provide just enough texture to enhance the strong … Continue reading